Seagull: that sounds like a bird that would enjoy life on the coast, right? Despite their name seagulls do seem to be quite partial to life inland and can be spotted in great numbers pretty much everywhere.

City squares, high rise buildings, fields and even school yards are places where it is not unlikely to spot a seagull – and in towns and cities that are nowhere near to the sea.

Why have seagulls moved inland?

Of course there are people who suggest the birds are different sorts of gulls that have acquired the ‘sea’ moniker due to their habitat.

Either way, herring gulls and lesser black-backed gulls are traditionally known as coast-dwelling birds that feed on the fruits of the sea.

It is a disruption in the ready supply fish, particularly waste, due to changes in the fishing industry that some experts suggest could be a contributing factor in the gulls heading inland.

This is matched by a ready supply of waste food in cities and towns for the gulls to feast on – in particular at rubbish dumps.

Safer surroundings

Moving inland also means fewer predators, particularly on the rooftops of city buildings where the ‘urban’ seagulls tend to make their home.

The combination of a plentiful food supply and a safe nesting habitat has seen the numbers of urban seagulls rapidly increase.

In turn ‘rural’ seagulls that remain on the coast are in decline.

Wherever they live, however, seagulls are scavengers, whether that is stealing chips from seaside tourists or pestering workers enjoying a lunchtime sandwich.

With their numbers continuing to rise in heavily populated cities there is a growing chance that urban seagulls could become a more common pest, particularly for the food industry.

If you are experiencing a problem with seagulls that is affecting your business or home, get in touch with Total Bird Control.

 

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